Content & Writing:
Convert text to html, writing resources and more.


Geographical Location Names

  • Posted By: RankRaiser
  • ...

If you’re working on a project that uses location names, you can use Geonames.org for your research and to download databases of location names from around the world free of charge. GeoNames integrates geographical data such as names of places in various languages, elevation, population and more from various sources.

This geographical database is available for download free of charge under a creative commons attribution license. It contains over 10 million geographical names and consists of 7.5 million unique features, 2.8 million populated places and 5.5 million alternate names. It also offers some population and area statistics. According to the site Geonames users include Ubuntu, Apple’s SnowLeopard, Bing Maps, The New York Times and more.

 

geo location population density map

Web Accessibility Checker

  • Posted By: RankRaiser
  • ...

How accessible is your site to folks with disabilities? You can find out easily with the web accessibility checker at the International Center for Disability Resources on the Internet website at .

Simply put, accessibility means making resources usable by the largest number of people possible. Techniques used to make the Internet and Web accessible can range from very simple, like adding the ‘alt’ or ‘longdesc’ attribute, to the more complex, like changing scripts, navigation and structure of a site.

When we used the web accessibility checker to test our site the results resembled a to-do list with instructions. Changing the ‘alt’ attribute for images came up several times. This is a reminder that a text equivalent for every non-text element should be provided and the use of the word ‘image’ or ‘.jpg, .gif, .bmp, .jpeg’ within the text should be avoided, which makes sense because it’s not descriptive of what the image actually is. The text used within the ‘alt’ attribute should also be shorter than 81 characters.

Applying these techniques will help a visually impaired person access the content of a web page with software which will read text and describe the images it encounters on the page.

Other suggestions that may come up when you test your site are that redundant text links should be provided for each active region of a server-side image map; and that row and column headers should be identified for data tables for example.

For resources on making your site more accessible, including a Section 508 checklist, visit the ICDRI’s .

Frequency of Expressions and Phrases on the Web

  • Posted By: RankRaiser
  • ...

Not sure about how that saying went, or what pronoun to use with a specific expression? If you’re a native English speaker, or you’ve learned English as a foreign language, Netspeak is a great tool for improving your writing.

Enter the beginning of a phrase into the search box and the different and most frequent ways that phrase or expression are used is shown. You can sort the results by the most frequent order of the words, and the most common option. It doesn’t mean that the results you’ll get are the correct way an expression is used, but they are the most frequent and common ways an expression is used.

Analyze Your Text

  • Posted By: RankRaiser
  • ...

Whether you’re analyzing for keyword density or trying to improve your writing by identifying words you seem to overuse, Textalyser.net can help. You either copy and paste your text to be analyzed or enter an URL and then set analyzing options like minimum characters per word, special word or expression to analyze, log the query (only for websites), apply stoplist and more. This is a simple, but very useful tool for analyzing any text on or off the web.

Try it out here:


E-book or eBook?

  • Posted By: RankRaiser
  • ...

Is it e-book or eBook? With all these internet terms, who can keep up with what’s considered the correct spelling? Well, why not find out from an authority on writing, namely the Associated Press which publishes the AP Stylebook, also known as” the journalist’s bible.” They have a few resources accessible for free, including a very useful Ask the Editor FAQ Guide. So which one is it? OK, we’ll tell you here: it’s supposed to be e-book and not eBook, meaning it needs a hyphen, as all other e- expressions do. But, it’s email and not e-mail, which is the only exception. Why the difference?

From their website: “AP’s acceptance of email reflects the reality of usage. Other e- terms, which aren’t as widely used in daily discourse, are clearer with the hyphenated spellings. Thus AP is sticking with e-business, e-commerce and others that abbreviate electronic.”
Including e-book.